Roshanstudio1

ArtistsinAuction

If travel is the key to art, then artist Roshan Houshmand has successfully unlocked the door to creativity.

Born in the Philippines, where she lived for eight years, Houshmand then moved to Iran, her native land. While she currently lives in upstate New York, she has resided in no less than half a dozen places all over the world, including New York City, New Mexico and Arizona. But, Barcelona, Spain, where she lived for ten years, was the most important place in her life as an artist.

The early years

When Housmand was a child her dad used to manage a paint factory. She fondly remembers her love of playing with the many samples at a very early age. Once she attended art classes, she began to dabble in many facets of the arts – painting, sculpture, lithography – experiencing it all, but she finally focused on painting.

In college her work was mainly abstract in nature, but her travels lead to new inspiration.

On Travel and Particle Theory

Houshmand believes that travel is essential to her painting because the experiences allow her to absorb different colors and visions and to move out of her comfort zone. She also feels that working under unfamiliar circumstances results in the discovery of different techniques. Currently, she teaches at SUNY Delhi as well as private painting students, many of whom join her for painting workshops each January at a chosen venue in the world.

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Her flower series are specific examples of the influence of her travels and they emerged from time spent in the deserts of Arizona. These pieces just burst with color and Houshmand admits that some of the magic is due to the fact that these life forms were so out of context to the surroundings.

Camelia

Camelia

Houshmand’s most recent paintings are influenced by physics and, specifically, by a lecture that she attended in the summer of 2005 at Columbia University in New York. She soon began creating black and white pieces based on the following of particle trails, and later shifted the technique to color. She explains that this particular technique is all about painting in the moment.

One example is “Zed,” inspired by the photography of particle trails from bubble chambers. The spirals are trails that signify a certain amount of energy transmission and the title, oddly enough, is based on a wacky Dr. Seuss character.

Zed

Zed

“Celestial Chamber,” while based on particle trails, includes manipulated lines and conveys a sense of telescopic imagery. The horizontal and vertical lines, as well as the spirals, all remind her of map making.

Celestial Chamber

Celestial Chamber

The Painting is in the Process

“Constellation” and the other dot paintings were done in Nicaragua and are meditative compositions based on schools of fish. While creating this piece and others like it, she found a very soothing feeling in the process.

Constellation

Constellation

Houshmand paints everyday and she says the process itself is what gets her inspired. Her work continues to evolve over time and these days she is using much more color. All her pieces are extremely organic and one need not understand physics to gain a spiritual sense from her work.

 

 

Black Bird

Black Bird

She sells quite a bit of work off of her website as well as on other online venues, like ArtistsinAuction, and through local galleries. We are thrilled that she has joined us in our venture.

To view the ArtistsinAuction website click here.

To view more of Roshan Houshmand’s work, click here.

Blue

Blue

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Evening Light

Evening Light

ArtistsinAuction

“Until you apply things with love you cannot start living,” says artist, Mary Sonya Conti. And there is no question that she thoroughly loves what she does. You can just hear it in her voice as she explains her unique techniques. But even more so, you can see the love she puts into every single piece of her art.

“Sonya” is a self taught artist that learned her craft at a very young age – long ago when her mom started craft night for she and her six siblings. Each kid had to create a different project from things collected outside the house. It was a great form of entertainment and a great way to expand the imagination, something she fears has gotten lost these days. Sonya clearly remembers collecting river rocks and tiling the bathroom floor at seven years old – a technique that has, ironically, become really popular today.

Much of Sonya’s work is based on tactile objects found in her garden – hosta and maple leaves, gravel, moss, and even dirt. She explains that the idea is to stay connected to what is around her so as to elicit a feeling and a mood- a defined focus from the many textured elements she uses. She admits she can even produce a fragrance from certain textures. If she does her job well the viewer will connect with the piece and further spark the imagination.

Unique techniques

One popular technique Sonya uses is with gauze. Concentrated watercolors are poured over the material, which is then draped to bring texture and lines. Once the piece has dried and the material is peeled back (sometimes she leaves the material in the work), the piece conveys the feel and texture of linen, and the colors are all blended naturally. Images are built slowly in this way. She then finishes the entire work by sealing the gauze with a glaze so it won’t deteriorate. As you can imagine, it’s a very time consuming process.

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Five years ago, Sonya started teaching workshops in which she teaches her “laying” techniques, specifically, the laying of elements into color and certain pouring methods.

Her Work

“Through a Child’s Eye,” was created by highlighting the veining of hosta leaves. Acrylic inks were poured over and the “bones” were revealed once the leaves were peeled off. Then detailing began – pen and ink, as well as diluted watercolors were used to build up a glazing effect. Originally Sonya set out to create a peacock, but an excited child changed her mind in mid-creation and she just let the piece be what it was.

Through A Child's Eyes

Through A Child's Eyes

“Giving Tree” is part of a series in the ArtistChallenge.com. Artists are selected and invited to create based on a chosen theme. This one was based on the story about the giving tree, a tree that had supported a man all throughout his life. The group showcases their work in two monthly local galleries.

Giving Tree

Giving Tree

“Riviera” was a commission for the Dayton Philharmonic Opera House. It was actually housed in the ladies bathroom – greatly admired by all the women who saw it. “You have to start somewhere,” says Conti.

Home Comfort on the Riviera

Home Comfort on the Riviera

Mary Sonya Conti has two upcoming local shows in September, and she is up for selection as a mural artist for the city of Dayton, Ohio. We wish her much success.

To view the ArtistsinAuction website click here.

To view more of Mary Sonya Conti’s work, click here.